?

Developer,wales,investor,land

  1. Yes

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. No

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. Interesting

    1 vote(s)
    100.0%

Welsh development

Discussion in 'Development' started by kchiggs, Dec 8, 2017.

  1. kchiggs

    kchiggs Member

    Any investors or landowners ever thought of trying to use the new laxer planning permission rules in Wales for a quicker return?

    I figure on 100 dwellings on site being a good viable number.
     
  2. nmb

    nmb Well-Known Member

    Do you have any details you could share with us - sounds interesting.
     
  3. kchiggs

    kchiggs Member

    Basically low impact development is outside the standard pp in a lower regime. As long as your close to a large city or even better brownfield land ex warehouse ex office ex hospital perhaps and site is large enough can make it a sustainable development good examples in friberg Germany. Would be most profitable in UK if you were building HMO types. In friberg they make so much off it they paid for a their own tram line and still made a profit.
     
  4. kchiggs

    kchiggs Member

    Basically low impact development is outside the standard pp in a lower regime. As long as your close to a large city or even better brownfield land ex warehouse ex office ex hospital perhaps and site is large enough can make it a sustainable development good examples in friberg Germany. Would be most profitable in UK if you were building HMO types. In friberg they make so much off it they paid for a their own tram line and still made a profit.
     
  5. lookinginvest

    lookinginvest Member

    Sounds very interesting - can only image the potential yield on a number of HMOs on one of these sites. While there is a need to protect greenfield sites, etc we do need to see a change in the planning permission application system in the UK - far too much red tape and time wasted.
     
  6. kchiggs

    kchiggs Member

    Even better since there likeley to be energy plus in order to qualify for the laxer rules CURRENT ones utility bills top out at £100 A year for four people (not counting electricity for computer,tv etc).

    Agree on the principle of preserving greenfield although needs to be rethought (some brownfield land is actually more ecologically valuable than greenfield land) so a cap and trade of limited greenfield development in exchange for converting brownfield into "green lungs" can be a win win.
    Green lungs are basically areas to encourage wildlife usually with ponds,swales or other methods to hold surface water from road/roof runoff with public access. Often interconnected by cycle paths, walking trails or public rights of way or as a linear route so as to be a wildlife corridor. Can really rejuvenate an inner city, preserve spacing between limited development (esp if no car building on a rail line in the belt, surrounded by a new forest hiding the development and linked to the inner city brownfield land)
    I think it's good that Wales is experimenting and if some developers took this up it might encourage other areas of UK to explore as possible solution to housing crisis. It would work with micro-houses too of course. However economics change then. If large hmo type ate succesfull then maybe micro-flays could become affordable.
     
Loading...

Share This Page