Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

United Arab Emirates to introduce 5% VAT

Discussion in 'Dubai property' started by Damian George, Jun 3, 2008.

  1. Damian George

    Damian George New Member

    United Arab Emirates to become first oil-rich Gulf Arab state to introduce value added tax. DUBAI - The United Arab Emirates is on course to shed its reputation as a tax haven and become the first oil-rich Gulf Arab state to introduce value added tax, marking a step towards diversifying public revenues.

    As early as next year, shoppers in the sumptuous malls of Dubai -- the city-state whose oil resources are dwindling -- could find a VAT of up to five percent slapped on their receipts.
     
  2. Ali786

    Ali786 New Member

    A bad news for residents..
     
  3. Wannaberich

    Wannaberich New Member

    DUBAL CHRONICLE:
    Dubai Customs has recommended a rate of three per cent for the value added tax (VAT) the UAE would introduce next year as part of a Gulf initiative.
    A final decision on the rate and timing of VAT's implementation will be taken by the federal government.

    This will mark the country's exit from a perceived 'tax-free' haven to a tax regime.

    Although the country is yet to formally launch direct tax, its residents have been paying indirect taxes in the form of fees, surcharges, and road tolls, etc.

    Dubai Customs director-general Ahmad Butti Ahmad said the UAE is likely to be the first country of the Gulf Cooperation Council to introduce the tax on goods and services.

    "VAT makes sense for Gulf states diversifying into sectors like tourism, hospitality and financial services," Ahmad said at a media briefing on Sunday night, and described it as "the best tax system" for boosting the UAE economy.

    --------------------------------

    This is the first step on the road to taxes for Dubai.Maybe soon you will also pay tax on your wages.
    I used to think how great is was that u guys dont pay tax.However,by the time you pay for your private health insurance plus schools,your not much better off than us in the UK.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 3, 2008
  4. Damian George

    Damian George New Member

  5. Wannaberich

    Wannaberich New Member

    GULF NEWS:
    Dubai wants VAT rate set at 3%
    By Shakir Husain, Staff Reporter
    Published: June 02, 2008, 23:32


    Dubai: Dubai Customs has recommended a rate of three per cent for the value added tax (VAT) the UAE would introduce next year as part of a Gulf initiative.

    A final decision on the rate and timing of VAT's implementation will be taken by the federal government.

    This will mark the country's exit from a perceived 'tax-free' haven to a tax regime.

    Although the country is yet to formally launch direct tax, its residents have been paying indirect taxes in the form of fees, surcharges, and road tolls, etc.

    Dubai Customs director-general Ahmad Butti Ahmad said the UAE is likely to be the first country of the Gulf Cooperation Council to introduce the tax on goods and services.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    "VAT makes sense for Gulf states diversifying into sectors like tourism, hospitality and financial services," Ahmad said at a media briefing on Sunday night, and described it as "the best tax system" for boosting the UAE economy.
     
  6. Damian George

    Damian George New Member

    looks like a range at the moment but it hasnt been finalised yet

    but it is funny that multiple stories are doing the rounds

    U.A.E. Plans to Introduce 5 Percent Value-Added Tax, 24/7 Says

    By Shaji Mathew

    June 3 (Bloomberg) -- The United Arab Emirates will introduce a value-added tax of as much as five percent to replace the existing customs duty, Emirates Business 24/7 reported, citing Dubai Customs.

    The final decision on the VAT rate and the timing of its introduction will be decided by the federal government, the Dubai-based newspaper cited Ahmed Butti Ahmed, Director General of Dubai Customs Authority, as saying.

    All six Gulf Arab states are planning to introduce the sales tax as early as 2012 to replace earnings from custom duties that will be eliminated as free trade agreements are signed with international trading partners, including the European Union, the U.S., India and China.

    To contact the reporter on this story: Shaji Mathew in Dubai at shajimathew@bloomberg.net
     
  7. reasonant

    reasonant New Member

    Found this link SSRN-Taxation in the Gulf: Introduction of a Value Added Tax by Sunil Thacker

    Taxation in the Gulf: Introduction of a Value Added Tax

    Sunil Thacker
    Partner, TLG, Dubai

    Michigan State Journal of International Law, Vol. 17, Issue 3, p. 721, 2008-2009

    Abstract:
    Taxation has become an indispensable part of modern economic systems worldwide, and there are a wide variety of different tax models with different policies, regulations, and collection systems that governments can choose from. Nations have realized the need to exercise care and caution in introducing new taxes. Political unpopularity and a general lack of proper planning and implementation, for example, have led the countries of Grenada, Malta, Belize, Vietnam, and Ghana to repeal their Value Added Tax (VAT) systems. On the other hand, the recent implementation of a VAT in India proved incredibly successful. In recent years, VATs have replaced traditional sales taxes in many countries, and several others are considering repealing their sales taxes and implementing a VAT. The oil rich states of the Gulf Region have long remained zero tax countries (8). However, with their rapid growth and persistent need for infrastructure, this tax policy is becoming less and less tenable. In just a few decades, the states of the Arabian Gulf have transformed their population centers from temporary tents built on dry, barren lands and sand dunes into ultra-modern, high-tech, and e-savvy boom towns. As a result of this increased growth and pressure on the region’s governments to provide infrastructure to support these growing urban centers, the Member States of the Gulf Cooperation Treaty, which together make up the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC), have felt the need to introduce a tax system in the region.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page